NÍŁCH’I, AIR; IINÁ, LIFE; KÉYAH, EARTH; TÓ, WATER, Amy Martin.

NÍŁCH’I, AIR; IINÁ, LIFE; KÉYAH, EARTH; TÓ, WATER, Amy Martin. 

Photo from WEAD Magazine essay Art & Healing On Sacred Land.

“Epidemics and extreme weather events are here, now. Creatives have vital roles to play:  to pique imagination, stimulate collective genius, and formulate multiple road maps to reach new truths and cross-species survival.”

Susan Leibovitz Steinman, Magazine Founder/WEAD Co-Founder

 

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Our 2021 Fall Fundraising Campaign: 25 years / $25,000, is needed to enhance our digital platform, create compelling interactive, archival functions and and update functionality to create a better user experience.

WEAD’s Mission is to serve the needs of our expanding global network of women activist-artists and lift the voices of those working for an ecologically healthy and just world. We are grateful for 25 years of WEAD and with your help look forward to the next 25.   

 

Here is what our new board member, Jane Chin Davidson, Professor of Art History and Global Cultures at California State University, San Bernardino has to say:

Going strong at twenty-five years, Women Eco Artists Dialog is an organization that accomplishes extraordinary things on behalf of an art that expresses for environmental and social justice movements. I speak for many researchers, artists, curators, activists, and audiences who greatly appreciate WEAD’s representation and shared resources, from supporting artists through its renowned professional directory to organizing prominent exhibitions and events promoting environmental awareness. These alone are amazing initiatives. 

 

As an art historian, I’ve often cited the leading scholars from WEAD Magazine who have brought attention to important environmental actions around the world. They include Reiko Goto, Margaret Shiu and Wu Mali discussing “Ecofeminism: Art as Environment—A Cultural Action at Plum Tree Creek” in Taiwan in addition to Susan Liebovitz Steinman’s important edition acknowledging “Atomic Legacy Artists” who gave voice to problems in “Japan, Chernobyl, New Mexico, and US areas threatened by aging nuclear plants in Florida, California and Washington.” Way ahead of its time, WEAD Magazine covered artistic projects in all parts of the globe, places where many environmental actions would’ve gone unnoticed, contributing to the new global perspective for eco art as an ongoing global category. 

 

What is profound is the fact that all of these important resources are offered by this long-standing non-profit institution, one that is run by a volunteer coalition of women-identified organizers. WEAD’s ability to maintain a passionate grassroots activism is remarkable at a time when humans desperately need to work together to address climate change and global-scale pollution. To support WEAD today is not only to actively foster environmental advocacy and solutions through artistic innovation but also to honor and recognize a unique and enduring women’s movement that is truly, truly special.